fredag, november 06, 2015

Bildning och folkbildning

Senaste numret av Nordisk Kulturpolitisk Tidskrift är ett temanummer om folkbildning med exempel från Sverige, Norge och Finland redigerat av mig och Henrik Nordvall. Stort tack till Jorun, Stenöien, Ann-Marie Laginder, Johan Jövgren, Annika Turunen och Louise Malmström för medverkan. Nordisk Kulturpolitisk Tidskrift är helt open access, så samtliga bidrag finns att ladda ner härifrån. Närmast de ämnen som brukar förekomma på den här bloggen är förmodligen Henrik Nordvalls och Louise Malmströms artikel om svenska socialdemokratiska riksdagsmäns utbildningsbakgrund och (folk)bildningssyn, samt min egen artikel om bildningssynen i svensk kulturpolitik de senaste hundra åren.
 part of a wider policy intended to change the culture of the Swedish people,using arts and culture – as well as formal education – as tools to create a cul-tural re-awakening, deepening democracy. The core perspective of ArthurEngberg, the minister responsible for cultural policy 1932–1939, can be sum-marized as a view of cultural policy as a process of
bildning
directed at theentire people, focusing on the cultural re-awakening of the working classes andthe reconnection of the arts to the people of the nation. Engberg was also anexample of a politician without a firm footing in the culture and educationorganizations which were already forming in the popular movements.Together with his respect for high art, this appears to have influenced his pol-icies and thus the early part of the establishment phase of Swedish cultural pol-icy, making it more focused at the central institutions of cultural policy and lessfocused on existing popular movements than it could otherwise have been.During the second half of the century, cultural policy largely became a supportsystem for professional arts and culture, aiming to enable the entire populationto gain access to the high quality arts produced by these, in that particular sensecontinuing this
 folkbildning
 project. Yet, the ambition to use explicit cultural
During the interbellum period, Swedish cultural policy could be viewed as a part of a wider policy intended to change the culture of the Swedish people,using arts and culture – as well as formal education – as tools to create a cul-tural re-awakening, deepening democracy. The core perspective of ArthurEngberg, the minister responsible for cultural policy 1932–1939, can be sum-marized as a view of cultural policy as a process ofbildningdirected at theentire people, focusing on the cultural re-awakening of the working classes andthe reconnection of the arts to the people of the nation. Engberg was also anexample of a politician without a firm footing in the culture and educationorganizations which were already forming in the popular movements.Together with his respect for high art, this appears to have influenced his pol-icies and thus the early part of the establishment phase of Swedish cultural pol-icy, making it more focused at the central institutions of cultural policy and lessfocused on existing popular movements than it could otherwise have been.During the second half of the century, cultural policy largely became a supportsystem for professional arts and culture, aiming to enable the entire populationto gain access to the high quality arts produced by these, in that particular sensecontinuing this folkbildning project. Yet, the ambition to use explicit cultural

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